Серия фотографий девушек с волосами в подмышках взорвала интернет

Фотограф Бен Хоппер нацелен на то, чтобы помочь людям понять, почему обществу так важно увидеть женщину с волосами в подмышках. В своей серии фотографий под названием « Естественная красота », которую он начал в 2014 году, он фотографирует и берет интервью у женщин, которые позволяют волосам на теле расти непрерывно по разным причинам. 

«Хотя волосы на подмышках являются естественным состоянием, они стали гонимы», — говорится на его сайте. «Почему это так? В течение почти столетия индустрия красоты промывала нам мозги, способствуя удалению волос. Создавая контраст между обычной «модной» женской красотой и грубым нетрадиционным видом волос подмышек у женщин, это не умещалось в моей голове, и я решил подискуссировать на эту тему.»

Ниже, посмотрите некоторые избранные фотографии из серии Хоппера. Остальные фотографии вы можете посмотреть на его сайте .

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Daily Mail made a new feature on my ‘Natural Beauty' project yesterday (link in my stories). ⠀ I’ve posted 2 photos from the project, and archived them. I wasn’t happy with their Engagement. This is the 3rd one I post. It's one of the 'strongest' photos from my 'Natural Beauty' project, probably the most viral one. It does make me wonder; Instagram doesn’t represent ‘my work’, it represents ‘my work on Instagram’. It’s the highlights, the viral content, the punchy stuff, the images that look good as a thumb, and will likely to attract more likes. Being on Instagram has been a very interesting learning experience for me. What am I doing here? Am I trying to go viral? Am I trying to share the work that I like? The latter has defiantly proved to be a pointless thing to do; each time I tried to share something I really loved, the engagement fell through. It’s a miserable feeling. No dopamine, no sympathy. I am trying to be mindful when I post on here, I am trying to be present. I am trying to honest with myself, truthful. It’s hard. It’s very hard and I think it's a bit of a shame. I would love to hear from you; what are YOUR thoughts & experience about it? ⠀ Anyway, it’s nice to see ‘Natural Beauty’ going viral again. It’s the 3rd time it’s happening since 2014. It’s a beautiful reminder how this subject and the format of the project is ever so relevant, still. It inspires me and reminds me the power of photography, the impact art has. ⠀ “…Your body is beautiful, you don’t need to burn it with lasers” – Maya Felix, in photograph (2014) See the rest of the project + words by the models on therealbenhopper.com (link in my bio).

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Jessica Hargreaves for ‘Natural Beauty’. October 2018. ⠀ “I originally stopped shaving maybe five or six years ago, really for physical reasons at first – my skin has Keratosis pilaris (those little bumps, like ‘chicken skin’) and so shaving was a nightmare, particularly on my legs. I would get the most terrible ingrown hairs, to the point that most of the hairs on my legs would have to be picked out with tweezers or they’d turn into painful spots. The same would happen on my vulva if I ever dared to shave, and eventually started on my underarms too. I tried a few different hair removal methods but nothing really worked, and eventually, I started to feel that my body was protesting, so I just stopped. ⠀ When I stopped shaving I finally felt free of my body’s reaction to hair removal and all the pain and hours spent exfoliating, just for my skin to look terrible anyway. At first, I wasn’t sure about how it looked but I’ve really grown to love my body hair, and I’ve never had any complaints from people whose opinion I care about. ⠀ I worked in a bar when I first stopped shaving, so I had some shocked reactions from some of the (male) customers and regulars, I think it was just a bit before hairy armpits (on women) became more common to see, so some of them were disgusted reactions, but honestly I felt like it was a pretty good misogyny filter. Most people don’t even notice, some people like it. ⠀ I did start to feel like it was a feminist action too — men have body hair and don’t tend to have any issues with it from others, or themselves. But really I think a lot of it was just that I’ve always been pretty boyish, never had much of a skincare routine and never really worn makeup (not that those things are bad or unfeminist!) just because those things don’t interest me much and aren’t on my radar – I’m not ‘feminine’ in that way, so hair removal just became another one of those things that I just didn’t feel made sense to me. I can’t be bothered.”

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